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2013 - CTS 2013 Congress


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Oral Communications 10

21.5 - Autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Phase I clinical trial

Presenter: Ekaterine, Berishvili, Tbilisi, Georgia
Authors: Ekaterine Berishvili1,2,3,4,5, Zurab Kakabadze1,2,3,4,5, Gocha Shatirishvili1,2,3,4,5, George Loladze1,2,3,4,5, Konstantin Mardaleishvili1,2,3,4,5, Nicolas Kipshidze1,2,3,4,5, Akaki Archvadze1,2,3,4,5

Autologous transplantation of bone marrow mononuclear cells in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Phase I clinical trial

Ekaterine Berishvili1,2,3,4,5, Zurab Kakabadze1,2,3,4,5, Gocha Shatirishvili1,2,3,4,5, George Loladze1,2,3,4,5, Konstantin Mardaleishvili1,2,3,4,5, Nicolas Kipshidze1,2,3,4,5, Akaki Archvadze1,2,3,4,5

1Tbilisi State Medical University, Tbilisi, Georgia; 2Central University Hospital, Tbilisi, Georgia; 3Georgian National Institute of Medical Research, Tbilisi, Georgia; 4Mardaleishvili Medical Center, Tbilisi, Georgia; 5Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia

 

Background:Liver cirrhosis is characterized by distortion of the hepatic architecture and the formation of regenerative nodules. Liver transplantation is one of the few available therapies for such patients. It has been shown recently, that hat bone marrow cell infusion repairs liver fibrosis in the cirrhotic liver.
Methods:This study was performed to determine the safety and tolerability of intrahepatic transplantation of autologous bone marrow mononuclear cells into five patients with liver insufficiency. The bone marrow mononuclear cells were isolated and infused into liver via hepatic artery. At different time points after the transplantation, the liver function and prothrombin time (PT) were evaluated, and the survival rate and symptoms of the patients were recorded.
Results:No complications or specific side effects related to the procedure were observed; all patients showed improvements in serum albumin, bilirubin and ALT after one month from the cell infusion. Conclusion: Our study has shown both the safety and feasibility of this type of liver cell therapy and may be a bridge to liver transplantation
 


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