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Just Released
Transplantation - March Issue

Infections with Ureaplasma in lung transplants are better beaten early through prophylaxis than treated later. cAMR remains a continuing quest as do the best measures of primary outcomes in enal transplant trials. We have passed 30 years of tacrolimus, and a reflection on these years provides a great summary of the CNIs. The selection of critically ill patients with cirrhosis for liver transplantation is examined in a useful consensus review. Donor derived cell free DNA tells a seductive story to promote its widespread use, but perhaps we need to look past the story to the real data on what elevated levels are and what they mean. There is much more in this issue for everyone to read and consider.

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The editors of this journal are pleased to offer electronic publication of accepted papers prior to print publication. These papers can be cited using the date of access and the unique DOI number. Any final changes in manuscripts will be made at the time of print publication and will be reflected in the final electronic version of the issue.

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ISN-TTS JOINT WEBINAR
Donor/Recipient Pair:
RISKS VS. GAINS - KIDNEY FUNCTION

March 23, 2021
2:00 PM CET / 9:00 AM EDT (MONTREAL TIME)

Open to all healthcare professionals

Speaker: Marcelo Cantarovich, TTS President
Moderator: Jean Tchervenkov, Montreal, Canada

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Wednesday, April 7, 2021
2:00PM - 6:00PM (İstanbul Time Zone)

The Middle East Society For Organ Transplantation (MESOT) invites you to a new webinar on How to Increase Organ Donation and Transplantation in Our Region during the Covid-19 Pandemic Period.

With COVID-19 pandemic spreading across the globe since last year, it had the immediate effect of severely reducing living and deceased organ donation and transplantation activity worldwide.

Hot off the Press 

«HOT OFF THE PRESS» 
RECENT PUBLICATIONS IDENTIFIED
BY TTS EDUCATION COMMITTEE ON COVID-19

Selected Publications by TTS Education Committee. This week's selection made by Drs. Enver Akalin and Millie Samaniego.

Association of Convalescent Plasma Treatment With Clinical Outcomes in Patients With COVID-19: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Perrine Janiaud et al.
JAMA. doi:10.1001/jama.2021.2747 Published online February 26, 2021.
A total of 1060 patients from 4 peer-reviewed RCTs and 10 722 patients from 6 other publicly available RCTs were included. The summary risk ratio (RR) for all-cause mortality with convalescent plasma in the 4 peer-reviewed RCTs was 0.93 (95%CI, 0.63 to 1.38), the absolute risk difference was −1.21% (95%CI, −5.29% to 2.88%), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision. Across all 10 RCTs, the summary RR was 1.02 (95%CI, 0.92 to 1.12) and there was moderate certainty of the evidence due to inclusion of unpublished data. Among the peer-reviewed RCTs, the summary hazard ratio was 1.17 (95% CI, 0.07 to 20.34) for length of hospital stay, the summary RR was 0.76 (95%CI, 0.20 to 2.87) for mechanical ventilation use (the absolute risk difference for mechanical ventilation use was −2.56%[95%CI, −13.16%to 8.05%]), and there was low certainty of the evidence due to imprecision for both outcomes. Limited data on clinical improvement, clinical deterioration, and serious adverse events showed no significant differences. In summary, treatment with convalescent plasma compared with placebo or standard of care was not significantly associated with a decrease in all-cause mortality or with any benefit for other clinical outcomes. The certainty of the evidence was low to moderate for all-cause mortality and low for other outcomes.

BNT162b2 mRNA Covid-19 Vaccine in a Nationwide Mass Vaccination Setting

Noa Dagan et al.
NEJM. February 24, 2021. DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa2101765
In this study, data from Israel’s largest health care organization were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. Estimated vaccine effectiveness for the study outcomes at days 14 through 20 after the first dose and at 7 or more days after the second dose were evaluated in 596,618 persons. The researchers found that, at 7 days or more after the second shot, Pfizer’s vaccine was 94% effective at preventing COVID-19 and 92% effective against severe disease. The results were consistent across all age groups, including in people aged 70 and older. The results were strikingly close to efficacy estimates from clinical trials, despite being based on jabs administered in less stringently controlled settings and more diverse populations, including people with multiple health problems. The study also covered a period when the emerging variant called B.1.1.7 was circulating widely in Israel, which suggests that the vaccine is effective at preventing COVID-19 caused by that variant.

Impact of COVID-19 in solid organ transplant recipients

Lara Danziger-Isakov et al.
Am J Transplant. 2021;21:925–937
This review article addresses address the impact of COVID-19 on organ transplantation globally and review current understanding of the epidemiology, outcomes, diagnosis, and treatment of COVID-19 in SOT recipients


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